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Shakespeare's influence on language [Quiz]

We still use many of Shakespeare's words and phrases today. Take our quiz to learn more about Shakespeare's influence on the English language.

Grafitti painting of Shakespeare

William Shakespeare wrote 37 plays between 1590 and 1613. 

Language at the time was still developing and as a result many of Shakespeare's words and phrases became used in everyday language. 

Shakespeare's language quiz

Test your knowledge of these words and phrases by matching the 12 words and phrases to their meaning.

Phrase

Meaning

'Wild goose chase' (Romeo and Juliet) Jealousy
'Green-eyed monster' (Othello) When in love you can't see that person's faults
'Arch-villain' (Timon of Athens) Having too much of something you like 
'Dishearten' (Henry V) A foolish and hopeless search
'Fair play' (The Tempest) The beginning of a joke
'Love is blind' (The Merchant of Venice) The whole thing. The last word.
'Break the ice' (The Taming of the Shrew) Lose confidence or determination
'Heart of gold' (Henry V) Following current style
'Fashionable' (Trolius and Cressida) A kind person
'Knock, knock! Who's there?' (Macbeth) Respect for the rules
'You can have too much of a good thing' (As You Like It) To start a conversation with a stranger
'Be-all, end-all' (Macbeth) An evil person

Scroll down for the answers 👇

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Answers 

How many did you get right?

Phrase

Meaning

'Wild goose chase' (Romeo and Juliet) A hopeless search
'Green-eyed monster' (Othello) Jealousy
'Arch-villain' (Timon of Athens) An evil person
'Dishearten' (Henry V) Lose confidence or determination
'Fair play' (The Tempest) Respect for the rules
'Love is blind' (The Merchant of Venice) When in love, you can't see that person's faults
'Break the ice' (The Taming of the Shrew) To start a conversation with a stranger
'Heart of gold' (Henry V) A kind person
'Fashionable' (Trolius and Cressida) Following current styles
'Knock, knock! Who's there?' (Macbeth) The start of a joke*
'You can have too much of a good thing' (As You Like It) Having too much of something you like
'Be-all, end-all' (Macbeth) The whole thing. The last word.

*Do send us your best knock, knock joke.